(Source: srsfunny, via visualizingmath)

nemfrog:

Plate 2. Atlas and text-book of topographic and applied anatomy. 1905.

nemfrog:

Plate 2. Atlas and text-book of topographic and applied anatomy. 1905.

(via scientificillustration)

(Source: shishi-gamii, via spokeart)

sciencealert:

Former laser physicist turned artist, Tom Beddard, has created these incredible fractal models. They are ‘truly fractal’, because you can see more and more detail, the closer you peer down onto the surface.Read more: bit.ly/1iLThX4

sciencealert:

Former laser physicist turned artist, Tom Beddard, has created these incredible fractal models. They are ‘truly fractal’, because you can see more and more detail, the closer you peer down onto the surface.

Read more: bit.ly/1iLThX4

(via imathematicus)

enchantedconsole:

Based on this principle.

sciencesourceimages:

The Wasp And The Cockroach: A Horror Story

The Emerald Cockroach Wasp (Ampulex compressa) is native to South Asia, Africa and the Pacific Islands. It is known for its unusual reproductive behavior, which involves stinging a cockroach and using it as a host for its larvae.

See more images of the Emerald Cockroach Wasp

The female wasps of this species stings precisely into specific ganglia of their cockroach prey. It delivers an initial sting to a thoracic ganglion and injects venom to mildly and reversibly paralyze the front legs of its victim. Temporary loss of mobility in the roach facilitates the second venomous sting at a precise spot in the victims’s head ganglia (brain), in the section that controls the escape reflex. As a result of this sting, the roach will first groom extensively, and then become sluggish and fail to show normal escape responses.

The wasp proceeds to chew off half of each of the roach’s antennae. Being too small to carry the roach, the wasp then leads the victim to the wasp’s burrow by pulling one of the roach’s antennae in a manner similar to a leash. Once they reach the burrow, the wasp lays a white egg, about 2 mm long, on the roach’s abdomen. It then exits and proceeds to fill in the burrow entrance with pebbles to keep other predators out.

With its escape reflex disabled, the stung, “zombified” roach will simply rest in the burrow as the wasp’s egg hatches after about three days. The hatched larva lives and feeds for 4–5 days on the roach, then chews its way into its abdomen and proceeds to live as an endoparasitoid. Over a period of eight days, the wasp larva consumes the roach’s internal organs in an order which maximizes the likelihood that the roach will stay alive, at least until the larva enters the pupal stage and forms a cocoon inside the roach’s body. Eventually the fully grown wasp emerges from the roach’s body to begin its adult life. -Wikipedia-

All images above © Emanuele Biggi / FLPA / Science Source  

nemfrog:

Fig. 374. Anatomy, Descriptive and Surgical. 1858.

nemfrog:

Fig. 374. Anatomy, Descriptive and Surgical. 1858.

(via scientificillustration)

txchnologist:

Synthetic Cells Move On Their Own

What look like animated illustrations that could easily spring from a child’s imagination are actually newly unveiled artificial cells under a microscope.

Biophysicists at Germany’s Technical University of Munich along with an international team developed simple self-propelled biomachines in a quest to create cell models that display biomechanical functions.

The researchers say their work represents the first time a movable cytoskeleton membrane has been fabricated.

Read More

archiemcphee:

Don’t worry, Cthulhu is still fast asleep and no one has heard from the Kraken for centuries. This nightmarish maw is the beak of a female colossal squid, one that weighed 770 lbs (350 kg), measured nearly 11.5 feet long ( 3.5 m) and was recently dissected by scientists during a live webcast from the Museum of New Zealand Te Papa Tongarewa in Wellington, New Zealand. The squid was found by Captain John Bennett and his crew in Antarctic waters back in December 2013. She’s only the second intact colossal squid specimen ever recovered, providing an extraordinary opportunity for scientists to learn more about this mysterious species.

The squid’s eyes measured nearly 14 inches in diameter. The better to see you with, my dear. She also had three hearts, all the better to love you to tiny, bite-size pieces.

Click here for additional images, courtesy of the Museum of New Zealand Te Papa Tongarewa. Learn more about the colossal squid here.

Click here to watch the entire dissection.

[via Business Insider Australia and The Huffington Post]

(via mindblowingscience)

nami-shark8me:

#microscopy #polarizedlight Granite

nami-shark8me:

#microscopy #polarizedlight Granite